Student Success Stories

Brittany Shaver Named 2015 Future K-12 German Teacher Award Recipient
Not only an award-winning student, but Shaver is also working on two master's degrees currently: a Master’s in the Teaching of World Languages, focusing on German – and the other in Teaching English as a Second Language.
Student Success Stories: Jessica Ankenman
From the age of 15 I knew that I wanted to study German. However, I didn’t know what I wanted to do professionally until six years later. The Modern and Classical Languages Department has supported me every step of the way throughout my educational career and helped me make important decisions about my future.
David Crabbe
David Crabbe, a graduate student in the Division of Classics in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures has been awarded the Swift-Longacre-Scaife Fellowship for academic year 2012-13, in the amount of $6,000. The award was made in recognition both of what David had already accomplished in the Classics program and for his outstanding promise as a career Latin teacher.
Elizabeth Barnes
Elizabeth came to the University of Kentucky in 2009 and completed her MA in Classics in May of 2011. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Florida in 2009, with majors in Classics and English.
Leighanne Root
A professor can impact a student during and after their college career in a plethora of ways. Leighanne Root has been able to learn, utilize and grow with her professors throughout her time at the University of Kentucky.
Saying Sayonara To Kentucky
University of Kentucky graduate Amber Anderson traces her love of Japanese culture to childhood cartoons. “I remember watching TV at 10 or 11 years old and really enjoying Japanese animation,” she said.
sarah gooch Sarah Gooch
UK junior Sarah Gooch is one of only 161 recipients of the National Security Education Program Boren Scholarship. The Boren Scholar, from Georgetown, Ky., will use the $20,000 scholarship to study and teach in Japan in the fall.
Robert Wagoner
Robert Wagoner was an undergraduate and graduate student in Classics at the University of Kentucky. He earned a BA in Classics and Philosophy in 2002, and an MA in Classics and a Graduate Certificate in Latin Studies in 2004. As a graduate student at UK, Robert pursued both Greek and Latin studies.
Reed DeMarco
Reed DeMarco was born outside of Detroit, MI and earned his B.A. in Classics from Wayne State University in Detroit in 2007. He was then awarded a teaching assistantship for his graduate studies at the University of Kentucky, finishing his degree in 2009. After Kentucky, Reed moved back to Michigan to pursue a teaching certification at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids.
Erika Peck Bucciantini
When my students ask me why I became a Latin teacher, I often tell them it was fate. This, obviously, is the short answer I give during class time when they have asked an off-topic question to avoid conjugating deponent verbs or learning about gerunds and gerundives. The truth of the matter is that I have grown to love the Latin language and couldn’t imagine my life without it.
RJ Parson
RJ “Publius” Parsons came to the University of Kentucky after several years in which he taught high-school music and Latin in Miami, Florida, and Glendale, California. He has done extensive research into impressionistic music theory, medieval polyphony, and renaissance counterpoint most recently creating a musical score of sacred motets written by the sixteenth-century Flemish composer Noe Faignant.
Jonathan Meyer
Jonathan Meyer studied classics and religion at Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI) and Yale Divinity School before coming to the University of Kentucky. He has also participated in the summer Latin program directed by Reginald Foster (OCD). He has taught students in Latin and Greek at the high school and college levels and has assisted in graduate courses dealing with biblical studies, religious history, and ancient Greek history.
William Little
Hailing from Carmel, CA, William Little completed his undergraduate studies at Harvard University in 2010 and subsequently earned a Master’s Degree in Medieval Studies at Fordham University, where he wrote a thesis exploring the practice and use of Biblical exegesis at the eleventh-century court of Matilda, Countess of Tuscany. His interests lie in the intellectual and literary history of the Latin Middle Ages, in particular Biblical exegesis and the reception of classical texts (especially poetry).
Donald Handshoe
Donald Handshoe, a senior and a double major in Classics and Anthropology, divides his time between his studies and his work, both of which as it turns out have to do with archaeology, his passion.
Joey Bradley
In the words of the late Steve Jobs, "You can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards." In retrospect, it may seem odd that a Russian degree received from UK in 2001 led me to software development. However, the instruction at UK prepared me to think different. In my opinion, writing computer code required the same thought process as communicating in Russian.
Hannah Bell
Hannah Arthur Bell graduated in 1999 from the College of Arts & Sciences with a major in English and a minor in Russian Studies. During her sophomore year, Hannah traveled with her father to St. Petersburg, Russia, to see one of his plays performed at the University of St. Petersburg.
Marcello Lippiello
Marcello Lippiello earned his MA in Classics and the Graduate Certificate in Latin Studies at the University of Kentucky, both in 2005.
Antoine Haaker
Antoine Haaker was born in Boulogne-sur-mer (France) and did his undergraduate studies in Classics at the University of Lille. During the summer, he once travelled to Rome in order to attend the Latin course of Father Reginald Foster. Father Foster is a Carmelite who used to work in the Vatican at the Latin letters office where official documents of the Church are written in or translated into Latin.
Rachel Philbrick
Rachel Philbrick was born and raised in Cambridge, Mass., and attended high school at the Commonwealth School, a small, private institution in Boston’s Back Bay. Commonwealth’s small size fostered a stimulating intellectual environment, encouraging interactions between students and faculty. It was here that Rachel first encountered Latin, studying it for four year and travelling, in her junior year, to Italy with her Latin class.
Miller Krause
Miller came to the graduate program in classics at the University of Kentucky in the autumn of 2006, drawn by the Institute for Latin Studies and the allure of learning to use Latin as a language rather than seeing it as a puzzle or a code standing between an author and a reader.
Joseph Tipton
Joseph Tipton is currently a predoctoral fellow in the Department of Classics at the University of Pittsburgh. In addition to teaching courses in Greek history, ancient mythology and classical literature, he is writing his dissertation which deals with the philosophical commitments underlying the Athenian democracy in the Periclean period as evidenced in philosophical, historical and dramatic texts.
Christiana Holsapple
Christiana Holsapple, an International Studies senior at the University of Kentucky, is also completing minors in Russian and Spanish languages. Throughout her years at the University of Kentucky, Holsapple has been extremely active. She completed an internship with Kentucky Refugee Ministries, served as a peer advisor in the Education Abroad Office, presented research to state legislators at Posters at the Capitol, and was a member of Sigma Delta Pi, the Spanish Honor Society.
Coady Brownstein
During my four years at the University of Kentucky, I discovered my passion in life. My freshman year, I signed up for a Russian language class, and just fell in love with the language, the culture, and the literature of the Russian people.
Dan Sheffler
When you ask UK University Scholar Dan Sheffler to name one of his favorite books, he immediate replies The Confessions of St. Augustine. Leaning back in his chair, his face lights up and searching the ceiling, he begins to describe why. “I feel that when I read The Confessions Augustine is talking to me, as if he were directly addressing me,” Sheffler explained. “Even though it is all obviously addressed to God I feel like I’m sort of sitting in the room. I feel like I can completely relate to Augustine’s position in his life, and I can really connect with what he’s saying.”
Cassie Hardin
Cassie Hardin was sure that she wanted to explore her passion for studying languages after arriving at the University of Kentucky in the fall of 2008, but she also knew that she getting tired of more traditional romance languages. She wanted something new; she wanted a new horizon. So how did Hardin arrive at her decision to pursue courses in UK’s Chinese Studies program? She left it up to chance.
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