By Whitney Hale, Alexis Simms

(Nov. 18, 2015) — The next Distinguished Scholar Lecture presented by University of Kentucky Confucius Institute will examine the spiritual state of wu-wei (effortless action). "Trying Not to Try: Cooperation, Trust and the Paradox of Spontaneity," to be delivered by Canadian researcher and scholar Edward Slingerland, will begin at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, at the Niles Gallery located in the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center. The lecture/discussion, and a reception scheduled for 11:30 a.m., are free and open to the public.



By Weston Lyod

(Nov. 12, 2015) — The University of Kentucky's Confucius Institute will take audiences on "A Journey to Ancient Haungzhou" with the Huangmei Opera. The program will begin 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 14, at the Singletary Center for the Arts. The performance is free and open to the public.

“A Journey to Ancient Haungzhou” will showcase the talents of China’s Huangmei Opera in traditional dance and music. The troupe was formed in the 18th century and is one of the most noted traditional opera theaters in China. The Huangmei Opera comprises 30 performers including musicians, singers, actors, dancers and martial artists.

"UK Confucius Institute brings to the UK campus and the Lexington community quality art forms directly from China so that the students, faculty and the citizens of the Commonwealth can experience firsthand high quality Chinese performing


By Dara Vance

The importance of meeting an international delegation can be exciting and intimidating.  Serving as the delegation’s language translator adds an additional level of excitement and importance.  Caroline Board, graduate student in French and Francophone Studies, was delighted to interpret for a delegation from Djibouti during their visit to the University of Kentucky in September.  

Caroline became interested in studying language after taking French to satisfy her undergraduate language requirement.

“After I had taken a few French classes I decided I really liked the language and wanted to continue learning it,” she said.

Caroline studied in France for a summer semester and a fall semester during her undergraduate studies.  Between her bachelor and master’s studies at UK she taught English in France for eight months.

Her international


By Tiera Carlock

(Nov. 2, 2015) — Laura Roché Youngworth, University of Kentucky alumna, was named the 2015 Kentucky World Language Teacher of the Year by the Kentucky World Language Association (KWLA). The KWLA's Outstanding Teacher Award recognizes an achieving individual in the language teaching profession who engages students to learn inside and outside of the classroom, meets the goals of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learners, and advocates for his or her community.

In addition, Stayc Dubravac, associate professor in the


By Whitney Hale

(Oct. 29, 2015) — The University of Kentucky's Confucius Institute is teaming up with the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures to present a special lecture on machismo and China's Zuo tradition by scholar David Schaberg. The free public lecture, "Machismo in Early China," is from 4:30-6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3, in the Alumni Gallery at William T. Young Library, with a reception to follow.

In a presentation on China's first great historical work, the Zuo tradition (Zuozhuan), Schaberg will show how proto-Confucian models of ritual behavior developed


By Tiera Carlock

(Oct. 14, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Confucius Institute will present a lecture on the historical development and manifestations of [the notion of] "yinyang" and its origins in Chinese thought and culture by Robin R. Wang as a part of its Distinguished Scholar Lecture Series. The free public lecture, titled "Yinyang: The Way of Ways," is from 2:30-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16, in the Patterson Office Tower 18th Floor, West-End Lobby, with a reception to follow.

Wang, philosophy professor and director of the Asian and Pacific


By Whitney Harder

(Sept. 24, 2015) — During a recent visit to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a delegation from the East African nation of Djibouti visited the University of Kentucky and experienced what it means to "see blue."

The visit included Aboubaker Hassan Ali, secretary general of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research for Djibouti; Madina Daher Okiye, secretary general of the University of Djibouti; Col. Mohamed Ali Obsieh, commander of Military Education; and Said Mohamed Farah, first secretary of the Djibouti Embassy.

The group was welcomed by Carey Cavanaugh, former U.S. Ambassador and director of the Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, and Patterson School students. Two graduate students in the Department of


By Jenny Wells

(Aug. 26, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence honored its newest class of Chellgren Fellows Sunday, Aug. 23. Five Chellgren Endowed Professorships were also announced. 

The Chellgren Fellows Program is for students with exceptional academic potential and aspirations, who are eager to participate in a special learning community designed to cultivate extraordinary achievement. Outstanding faculty members from across campus serve as individual mentors for the Fellows.

The students selected as 2015-16 Chellgren Fellows include:

•  Sloan Ander, a biology major from


By Terrance Wade

(July 9, 2015) — University of Kentucky student Elizabeth Glass is participating in a highly competitive internship at the Cloisters Museum and Garden at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City this summer.

A native of Lexington, the art history and visual studies/museum studies senior who is also working toward a minor in German, began applying for summer internships over the past winter break. She applied to such museums as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, The 


Compiled by Tasha Ramsey

Three students of Japan studies have been accepted by the JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) program, sponsored by the Japanese government. Mikayla Rogers (Japan studies minor), Naomi Hayes (Japan studies minor), and Samantha Warford (Japan studies major) will work full-time as Assistant Language Teachers (ALTs) in the public school system in Japan this fall. We caught up with two of the three participants for some questions as they prepare for their travels.

Naomi Hayes

Hometown: Louisville, KY Major: Biology Minor: Japan Studies Year: Senior Fun fact: President of Korean pop dance group on campus for four years

Mikayla Rogers

Hometown: Richmond, KY Major: Biology Minor: Japan Studies


Four students of Japan Studies at the University of Kentucky participated in the annual Kentucky Japanese speech contest that took place in Norsworthy Auditorium, located next to the Fayette County board of education building, on Saturday, April 18, 2015. Henry Udaru won first place for the Level 4 competition (for college students who have studied Japanese up to four semesters). Udaru, a biology major and a student from Nigeria, is currently enrolled in JPN 202. In the speech, he talked about his desire to help people, particularly children, as well as his goal of becoming a medical doctor.James Nick Howard won third place, Zhenning Wang second place, and Ranta Widayanti first place for the Level 5 competition (for college students who have studied Japanese up to six semesters).  All of these students are currently


By Gail Hairston, Whitney Harder

(April 22, 2015) — The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences will honor its faculty at 4 p.m. today at the William T. Young Library Auditorium.

The recipients of this year's college faculty awards are:

Charles Carlson, psychology, 2015-16 Distinguished Professor. For more information, visit

Beth Guiton, assistant professor of chemistry ‒ Distinguished Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award

Guiton leads a materials chemistry group in the Center for Advanced Materials, investigates chemistry at the nanometer length scale, working at the intersection between solid state chemistry and


By Guy Spriggs

Brittany Shaver says she’s always been a hard worker. However, when she began her undergraduate study at the University of Kentucky as a biology major and then switched to chemistry, Shaver didn’t find fulfillment or results that matched her effort.

So at the end of her freshman year, Shaver tried to figure out her ideal major – what course of study would be just right for her.

“I thought, ‘If there was a Brittany major out there in the world, what would it be?’ One of the answers was German,” Shaver explained. “I always wanted to study German, but I first started the language at the University of Kentucky my sophomore year.”

While she says her path to studying German wasn’t clear or easy, Shaver’s interest in German language and culture dates back to her participation in



The College of Arts & Sciences is proud to announce the recipients of this year’s College teaching awards, They are Renee Fatemi, physics and astronomy (Outstanding Teaching Award), Moisés Castillo, Hispanic Studies (Outstanding Teaching Award), Charley Carlsonpsychology (Outstanding Teaching Award), Anna Voskresensky, MCLLC (Outstanding Teaching Award),


By Gail Hairston, Guy Spriggs

(March 31, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC) in the College of Arts and Sciences is changing how we think of language studies. Since the college’s recent merger of separate language units into a single entity, the 44-member department has set its sights on becoming a more cohesive intellectual community with a unified teaching and research mission. A brand new core curriculum, for all students regardless of their specific language focus, is the cornerstone of the project. 



By Guy Spriggs

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures (MCLLC) is changing how we think of language studies. Since the recent merger of separate language units into a single entity, the 44-member department has set its sights on becoming a more cohesive intellectual community with a unified teaching and research mission. A brand new core curriculum, for all students regardless of their specific language focus, is the cornerstone of the project. 

A major component of this new curriculum is MCL 200 – Global Literacy – an innovative team-taught course exposing students to texts from a variety of different cultural traditions and historical periods.

“The course is a new kind of introduction to



From the age of 15 I knew that I wanted to study German. However, I didn’t know what I wanted to do professionally until six years later. The Modern and Classical Languages Department has supported me every step of the way throughout my educational career and helped me make important decisions about my future. From writing countless letters of recommendation to one on one meetings discussing my future educational and career goals, the members of the MCL Department made it their priority to help me achieve my goals.

I know that the MCL Department wants every student to succeed and enjoys hearing such success stories because the professors in this department take pride in their students. This month I finally achieved my next educational goal. I have been accepted to Kent State University to complete my Master’s in German Translation. In addition to acceptance, I have


By Gail Hairston

(March 11, 2015) — Excerpts from Doug Slaymaker’s translation of Furukawa Hideo’s latest book “Horses, Horses, in the Innocence of Light” will be published on the online journal Words Without Borders today and Thursday.

The publication is in commemoration of the 3.11 earthquake/tsunami/meltdown disasters four years ago today. The book is the account of how one man, one nation endured an unbearable tragedy. Written in reverse chronology, it begins exactly one month after the magnitude 9 underwater earthquake spawned deadly tsunamis and a nuclear power plant meltdown. It is the distillation of a witness’s narrative of a disaster that killed nearly 16,000, moved the main island of Japan eight feet eastward, and shifted the Earth on its axis as much as 10 inches.

Words Without Borders’


By Gail Hairston and Doug Slaymaker

(March 6, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Japan Studies Program presents the documentary 『ほんとうの歌』 ("True Songs") March 11. The event coincides with the fourth anniversary of the 2011 earthquake/tsunami/nuclear power plant meltdown in Northern Japan.

The documentary will be screened with free admission at 7-9 p.m. Wednesday at the Kentucky Theatre on Main Street, downtown Lexington. 

“True Songs” follows the performances of a dramatic reading of the late Kenji Miyazawa’s “Milky Way Railroad” by several of Japan’s outstanding artists.


By Gail Hairston

(Feb. 27, 2015) — Thirty-five students from Lafayette, Scott County, Atherton and Eastern high schools visit the University of Kentucky campus on Saturday to immerse themselves in the Japanese culture and to compete in the Kentucky Japan Bowl®.

The Japan Bowl is a franchised quiz competition for high school students studying Japanese. The competition challenges the students’ knowledge of the Japanese language and culture.

“We are hoping that students will enjoy this event and get motivated to study Japanese even more,” said Atsushi Hasegawa, assistant professor of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures in the UK College of Arts and Sciences.

Hosted by UK Japan Studies, the Kentucky Japan Bowl is the regional


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