Blogs

We hope to have some blogs from our department to share with you shortly. In the meantime, you can look at other blogs written by the College of Arts & Sciences community.
dlro223's picture

How to Download Photographs of You and Your Friends on the A&S Website!

Have you found an image on our website that you love, and must have a copy of?

Here is how you can download and print that photograph and then charish it for the rest of your life!

 

 

1. Go to Univerity of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences website home page at: http://www.as.uky.edu/

2. If you haven't already taken a look at our recent photographs, take a look by choosing the Photos option on our homepage.

3. After you have made a decision on any photographs that you would like to have, return to the A&S homepage to find the FLICKR button. This link will bring you to our photostream on flickr, called UK College of Arts & Sciences. Below is an image of where the flickr button is on our A&S website homepage.

 

4. When you have successfully surfed to our flickr website account, UK College of Arts & Sciences, find your desired image by searching through the photostream, or more efficiently by clicking on the sets link shown here...

 

 

sdgi222's picture

The End of the Semester, and My First Year

Well, very soon winter break will be upon us, and with it comes the anniversary of A&S hiring me.

When I first started here a year ago, almost everything was new.  I'd made and edited videos before, but nothing like what I had to do when I started working.  It was like going from swimming in the kiddie pool to be dropped somewhere in the Pacific and having to swim just as well.  I had to ask around for help with nearly all my early projects.  It's amazing that the senior employees didn't get sick of me and chuck me out the window after a point.

My early videos were...less than stellar, to say the least.  Small errors that completely escaped me, but were obvious to anyone else who'd been working here longer than me.  Many edits were involved, if editing could salvage the wrecks I'd made.  It was panic-inducing to not be sure that my work was on par with what we expected to produce, as far as quality and timeliness goes.  Many nights, I went to sleep believing that I was completely in over my head.

jchie2's picture

Designing online education programs

Toyota Unveils High-tech Car Ahead of Show by associatedpress I was waiting at the help desk and in order to answer my questions, the receptionist was requesting information through the computer. The lady behind the desk was frustrated and said, “common, wake up computer!” Feeling frustrated towards our computers may not be too uncommon and some researchers, like Surakka and Vanhala, suggested that our frustrated respond to a computer is similar to how we would response to another human being. They asserted that humans are born to interact with others and this inclination of social interaction causes humans to respond to inanimate objects in an emotional way. Toyota recently had a press conference in which they talked about their idea of future cars and the CEO said, “ a car must appeal to the emotion of its owner.” In other words, it is important for the car designer to design cars that can respond to its owner’s emotions.

 

ccamp2's picture

Consensus by Headbutting

We certainly don't headbutt each other here in our Hive - but we DO headbutt your problems (over and over again until they're solved). :-)

Bees by Thomas D. Seeley

Thanks for the inspiration, Ars Technica.

Photograph by Thomas D. Seeley

mastea2's picture

Online Education Survey Thoughts

     As we try to build up and expand our Online Education program here, it is important to be looking to see what others in the field are doing.  That is why I got so excited when I found the survey of Online Education, “Going the Distance.”  I recently summarized it for my team.  What was most important, I think, is that we are right where we should be in terms of the Online Education movement.  Most public institutions have an “in-house” team that deals with faculty training.  Also, this training tends to be “unofficial” and have “unofficial” mentoring as well. 

     Moreover, they mentioned the state of Online Education as a whole.  While enrollments are not increasing as quickly as they had been, this is because they have reached a steady plateau.  Some disciplines are also steadier than others, such as Psychology.  Other disciplines, such as Engineering and Biology are still gaining in enrollment.  This is likely because these disciplines are just now getting the thrust towards online classes and obtaining the tools necessary to make the courses successful, such as increased interactive online programs.

ccamp2's picture

FACTS about the University of Kentucky (circa 1973)

I'm always on the lookout for artifacts of graphic design. For example, I just ran across a catalog of Presstype materials from the early 80's. I've never produced any design work outside of a digital world - so it's a great way to appreciate just how much work went into the projects produced by my predecessors.

You can imagine that I was pretty excited when a friend of mine passed this little booklet along to me after his trip to UK surplus: "FACTS about the University of Kentucky." 

FACTS about the University of Kentucky (1973)

Appropriately, it was found inside of this "tanker" Steelcase desk.

Steelcase

Attached to this post is a pdf of the booklet featuring a comprehensive breakdown of registration fees ($202.50 per semester for all colleges, save Medicine and Dentistry), degrees granted (4,471 between 1970 and 1971), faculty count (2,200) and other interesting tidbits.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Cooper is a great font, huh?

 

daange2's picture

Sure, it's kinda funny.

                                                    

ccamp2's picture

QR Codes Go to College

Marketing agencies, Archrival and Axis of Awesome both specializing in youth and university markets recently completed a survey of students on 24 college campuses nationwide about their use of QR codes. I'm not terribly surprised at what they've found (indifference) - but I'd like to go one step further:

I'd suggest that it's the overuse of QR codes as a vehicle for advertisement which fuels this in the first place. They have (had) great potential to deliver information in a rapid and portable way. Now I find that no one uses them because they're expecting to be redirected to just another bland sales pitch.

What say you, students? How do you feel about QR codes?

From the article by Archrival:

"In the midst of the growing industry pressure to force-feed these barcodes into the marketplace, we noticed a profound indifference being shown to QR codes by the one demographic that can make or break a trend — college students."

QR Code Infographic

 

 

dlro223's picture

Scooba Army Series: featuring Russ Caldwell's collection

 

 

 

Tools used to create: Canon EOS 7D, Canon EFS 18-55mm, Canon Speedlite 580 EX II, Adobe Photoshop, Imagination.

ccamp2's picture

"The Snow" by Tokujin Yoshioka

I'm not sure if I prescribe entirely to Yoshioka's philosophy but he's nothing if not poetic - most especially visually.

"The most beautiful things I believe in this world is what is irreproducible, accidentally born, and disorder that cannot be understood by the theory. I believe the nature is the ultimate beauty in this world. The sunlight, soft breeze, and the harmony that leaves create, the variety of the essence in the nature touches our emotions. I intend not to reproduce them, but to pick the element that inspires our heart and integrate it into the deign." - Tokujin Yoshioka

Via Dezeen.

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