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african american and africana studies

Year of Equity Series: Linguists often talk the talk but how can we also walk the walk

    Part of diversity is linguistic diversity; part of equity is
    linguistic equity; and part of inclusion is linguistic inclusion.
 Yet, despite the many university initiatives around diversity,
    equity, inclusion and access, language and linguistic diversity
    are rarely part of the constellation of identity practices that
 are seen outside of linguistics as warranting efforts toward
    greater justice. Linguists can and should play an important
    role in advocating for the centrality of language within 
    inclusivity efforts, but many of our efforts to do so are less
    effective than we might hope.
 
    In this talk, I’ll explore some of the potential reasons why
    this has been the case and imagine (with your insight and help) 
    some ways that linguists could have more success in our efforts
    to enhance linguistic justice. By framing linguistic inclusion 
    in the context of standardized language privilege, I’ll present
    what we know about linguistic discrimination, pinpoint the
    linguistic stakes of DEI efforts, highlight some flashpoints
    that occur in public discussions about language such as with
    pronouns and political correctness, and finally offer some
    concrete steps that we as linguists can take to effectively
    advocate for the importance of language at all levels of
    intervention linked to greater inclusion and equity.
 

This talk is made possible by generous support from our friends in Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures; English; Gender and Women’s studies; Sociology; Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; African American and Africana Studies; and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Date:
-
Location:
233 Gatton College of B&E
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Social Conflict & Democracy: The Enduring Impact of Race on U.S. Politics

Part of the Political Science department's series on Social Conflict and Democracy, this panel focuses on the enduring impact that race and slavery hold over U.S. politics.  Featuring guest speaker Maya Sen of Harvard, presenting on "The Political Legacy of Southern Slavery," the panel include three Univ. of Kentucky faculty experts as well: Christia Spears Brown (Psychology), Melynda Price (UK Law), and Ray Block (AAAS & Political Science).

Cosponsored by the Quantitative Initiative for Social & Policy Research (QIPSR) and the College of Arts & Science's Keys to Our Common Future initiative.

Date:
-
Location:
Kincaid Auditorium (#111 Gatton B&E)
Campus Forum to Discuss Public Art at UK

What is the role of public art in an educational environment? How should we engage with our institutional past, in terms of art already at the University of Kentucky, and any proposed future projects? Who decides about public art on campus and how is the university community involved in the process?

trra223 Thu, 03/10/2016 - 10:22 am

Talk by Crystal Wilkinson

Please, join the UK Appalachian Center and the African American and Africana Studies Program in welcoming beloved author Crystal Wilkinson to Campus for a talk on Tuesday, April 5th. Ms. Wilkinson is the current Writer in Residence at Berea College and will present in the UKAA Auditorium in the W. T. Young Library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Her talk is titled Black Women and Mental Health in Appalachia. She will also read from her latest  novel, The Birds of Opulence and hold a discussion with audience members. This event is free, and all UK Students, Faculty, and Staff are most welcome to attend! Please, find more information about Crystal Wilkinson here

Date:
-
Location:
UKAA Auditorium, W. T. Young Library
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