Courses

CLA 551/651 - Greek Poetry

CLA 551 GREEK POETRY AND DRAMA (Subtitle required). (3)

A study of one or more works of Greek poetic and/or dramatic literature, which may include epic, lyric, tragedy, and comedy, selected from the whole of ancient Greek literature from Homer through the Roman period. A particular author, work, genre, or theme is selected each time the course is offered. Emphasis is placed both on mastering the Greek language and on literary analysis of the texts studied. Lectures and class discussions will further illuminate the literary and cultural milieu of the author or text. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under a different title. Prereq: CLA 252 or equivalent.


CLA 651 SEMINAR IN GREEK POETRY AND DRAMA (Subtitle required). (3)

Graduate seminar in Greek poetic and/or dramatic literature, which may include epic, lyric, tragedy, and comedy. Intensive study of the Greek text(s) is accompanied by considerable attention to current scholarship and bibliography. Students will write extended papers and present oral reports in class. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of the Classics DGS and instructor.

Subtitles

Ancient Epic Poetry

This course will focus on the epic poetry of Homer, Hesiod, Apollonius of Rhodes, Quintus of Smyrna, Nonnus. Caldesi-Valeri, Murray, Rabel

Poetry of Ancient Greek Sport
This course will focus the theme of sport in the poetry of the Classical and Hellenistic eras. - Murray

Ancient Greek Comedy 
This course will focus on one or more of the plays by Aristophanes. Caldesi-Valeri, Rabel

Ancient Greek Tragedy
This course will focus on one or more of the plays by Sophocles, Aeschylus and Euripides. - Caldesi-Valeri, Murray, Rabel

Hellenistic Poetry
This course focuses on Greek poetry created in the 3rd BCE - 1st CE. It may be a survey of the various genres or it may concentrate on a specific author or theme. - Murray, Rabel

Imperial Greek Poetry
This course focuses on Greek poetry created in the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE, including selections from the Greek Anthology as well as Quintus of Smyrna or Nonnus. - Murray

CLA 555/655 - Greek Prose

CLA 555 PROSE COMPOSITION (3)

The course is intended for students who wish to improve their command of Greek morphology and syntax, and aims to offer a solid foundation in the language enabling them to take advanced seminars in ancient Greek prose and poetry. The course will entail exercises in both traditional and creative composition along with readings from prose authors meant to familiarize students with a variety of prose styles. Caldesi Valeri, Murray

CLA 555 GREEK PROSE (Subtitle required). (3)

A study of one or more works of Greek prose literature, which may include history, biography, philosophy, satire, and the novel, selected from the whole of ancient Greek literature from Homer through the Roman period. A particular author, work, genre, or theme is selected each time the course is offered. Emphasis is placed both on mastering the Greek language and on literary analysis of the texts studied. Lectures and class discussions will further illuminate the literary and cultural milieu of the author or text. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under a different title. Prereq: CLA 252 or equivalent.

CLA 655 SEMINAR IN GREEK PROSE (Subtitle required). (3)

Graduate seminar in Greek prose literature, which may include history, biography, satire, and the novel. Intensive study of the Greek text(s) is accompanied by considerable attention to current scholarship and bibliography. Students will write extended papers and present oral reports in class. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of the Classics DGS and instructor.

Subtitles:

ANCIENT GREEK FICTION: Homer between Truth and Fiction
In this course we will explore the reception of Homer and the Homeric Poems in Greek authors of the Imperial Era. We will read selections from Lucian’s True Histories, Dio Chrysostom’s Trojan Oration, and Heliodorus' Aithiopika. Emphasis will be placed both on mastering the Greek language and on literary analysis of the texts studied. Class discussions and presentations will further illuminate the literary and cultural milieu of the author or text. CLA 555/655 May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under a different title. - Murray

Selected Readings from Plutarch
The course aims to introduce students to the prose style of Plutarch, an author who wrote both philosophical treatises and biographies of illustrious statesmen. Accordingly, our readings in Greek will also be bifocal and include selections from Plutarch's Dialogue on Love, which reaches back to Plato's works, as well as his Lives of Pericles and Alexander, two statesmen who left an indelible mark in Greek Classical history. Caldesi Valeri

Literature of the Persian Wars
This course focuses on the theme of the Persian Wars in the literature of the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. - Caldesi Valeri

The Ancient Greek Bible
This course offers students the opportunity to read the Ancient Greek Bible in the original language and to to learn about its history as a text. In addition to selections from the Greek translation of the Old Testament (the Septuagint) and the New Testament, we will read the Letter of Aristeas which records how the Hebrew Bible was translated in to Greek in the Hellenistic Age. Murray, Rabel

Women’s Literature in Ancient Greek
This course focuses on Ancient Greek Literature attributed to women, including the poetry of Sappho, Erinna, Nossis, Anyte and others. Murray


Christian Literature in Ancient Greek

This course focuses on Christian Literature written in Ancient Greek. Murray, Rabel

Jewish Literature in Ancient Greek
This course focuses on Literature written in Greek by Jewish authors in the Hellenistic and Imperial periods, including Philo, Josephus, Ezekiel, Aristaeus - Murray, Rabel

Ancient Greek Oratory - Caldesi-Valeri

Ancient Greek Biography

This course focuses on one or more of Plutarch’s Lives or other biographical texts. - Caldesi-Valeri, Martin, Murray

Ancient Greek Historiography
This course focuses on the works of Historiographical writing, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius - Caldesi-Valeri

Ancient Greek Philosophy 
Plato’s Dialogues, Aristotle’s works, Epictetus, Pre Socratic Philosophers, Plutarch - Caldesi-Valeri, Murray, Rabel

Hellenistic and Imperial Prose - Murray

CLA 616 - Greek Paleography
CLA 616 PALEOGRAPHY. (3) This course provides training in the skills needed to read the handwritten materials that constitute evidence for historical investigation of the production and circulation of information outside the medium of print. While the specific scripts to be studied will vary from semester to semester, depending upon whether the course is focused upon Latin paleography, Greek paleography, or vernacular paleographies, students will learn to read and transcribe manuscripts, to expand abbreviations appropriately, to recognize the chronological and geographical extent of particular scripts, to develop strategies for reading difficult scripts, to find the specialized reference works to assist them in studying handwritten materials, and to understand the historical arguments that have been constructed on the basis of analysis of scripts and the “archaeology of the book.” The course also provides training in basic codicology and editorial techniques for establishing a text and recording variant readings. Prereq: Some familiarity with the language of the materials. (Same as HIS 616.)

CLA 630 - Seminar in Greek and Latin Literature
CLA 630 SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE (Subtitle required). (3) This graduate seminar offers advanced, intensive study in two particular approaches to the study of Classics, requiring a broader and more inclusive approach beyond the scope of the typical Greek or Latin seminar. These are: 1) the coordinated study of works of both Greek and Latin literature, and 2) the study of a specific research area in classical studies and culture. One of these areas will be the focus of the course each time it is offered. Topics in the coordinated study of Greek and Latin literature can take various forms, such as the passions in Greek and Latin poetry, comparative Greek and Latin drama, Homer and Virgil, etc. Research in classics and culture involves extensive reading of a large body of sources and scholarship on a specific topic of current scholarly interest, along with the use of texts in the original language(s) for course assignments and papers. Appropriate competence in reading Latin and/or Greek texts is expected of all students in the course. Topics may include a focused aspect of Greek and/or Roman society, material culture, early Christianity – and its relation to classical culture, aspects of Medieval or Renaissance culture, or the ongoing influence of classical stories, ideals, and cultural forms in modern media. May be repeated for up to six credits on different topics. Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of the Classics DGS and instructor.

Subtitles:

Greek and Roman Historiography - Caldesi-Valeri

Greek and Roman Biography - Caldesi-Valeri

Greek Epigraphy - Caldesi-Valeri

Greek and Roman Drama: Seneca and Sophocles - Rabel

Greek and Roman Philosophy: Seneca and Epictetus - Rabel

Greek and Roman Poetry: Apollonius and Ovid - Murray

Greek and Roman Poetry: Callimachus for Latinists - Murray

Greek and Roman Poetry: Apollonius and Valerius Flaccus - Murray

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