institute for latin studies

Treating it Like Any Other Language: Kelly Lawyer and Latin

Graduate student Kelly Lawyer joins us in the podcast studio to discuss her study and passion for Latin, as well as possible paths she may be taking that interest in the future.

This podcast was produced by David Cole.

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Treating it Like Any Other Language: Kelly Lawyer and Latin by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

UK Latin Seminar, Internationally Recognized and Celebrated

This past summer marked the 16th anniversary of one of the world's most unique events held on UK's campus.

Elizabeth Barnes

Elizabeth came to the University of Kentucky in 2009 and completed her MA in Classics in May of 2011. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Florida in 2009, with majors in Classics and English.

Robert Wagoner

Robert Wagoner was an undergraduate and graduate student in Classics at the University of Kentucky. He earned a BA in Classics and Philosophy in 2002, and an MA in Classics and a Graduate Certificate in Latin Studies in 2004. As a graduate student at UK, Robert pursued both Greek and Latin studies.

UK's Institute for Latin Studies: Milena Minkova

The University of Kentucky has one of the most distinguished Classics programs in the world, and the UK Institute for Latin Studies (Graduate Certificate Curriculum) is now celebrating its tenth year. In this podcast, Milena Minkova, Director of Graduate Studies in the Division of Classics, describes the Institute for Latin Studies, the unique methods used to teach Latin to students in the program, and the value of the Latin language in today's world. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Classics Awarded Graduate School Academic Year Fellowship

By: Jonathon Spalding

For two millennia the leading intellects of Western Europe expressed their most sophisticated thoughts in a language that is now largely considered extinct.

Dirk Sacré and Literary Latin: Terrence Tunberg

Latin may not be the standard language in everyday conversation anymore, but its use spans well after the fall of the Roman empire. In fact, a visiting scholar will be visiting UK on March 5th to talk about Latin's lasting literary legacy. Dirk Sacré, a professor at the Catholic University of Louvain Belgium, is going to present the talk "A Vast and Unexplored Continent: the Latin Literature of the 18th Century, at noon in room 208 of the Whitehall Classroom Building.

In this podcast, Terrence Tunberg, a professor in the Division of Classics and the Director of the UK Institute for Latin Studies, describes the importance of Latin in modern literature, and a bit about the lecture and Sacré's research. The talk is in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Graduate Curriculum in Latin Studies, based in the Division of Classics in MCLLC. The event is co-sponsored by the Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, the Department of History, and the Department of Philosophy.

This podcast was produced by Sam Burchett and Cheyenne Hohman.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Reed DeMarco

Reed DeMarco was born outside of Detroit, MI and earned his B.A. in Classics from Wayne State University in Detroit in 2007. He was then awarded a teaching assistantship for his graduate studies at the University of Kentucky, finishing his degree in 2009. After Kentucky, Reed moved back to Michigan to pursue a teaching certification at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids.

Erika Peck Bucciantini

When my students ask me why I became a Latin teacher, I often tell them it was fate. This, obviously, is the short answer I give during class time when they have asked an off-topic question to avoid conjugating deponent verbs or learning about gerunds and gerundives. The truth of the matter is that I have grown to love the Latin language and couldn’t imagine my life without it.

RJ Parson

RJ “Publius” Parsons came to the University of Kentucky after several years in which he taught high-school music and Latin in Miami, Florida, and Glendale, California. He has done extensive research into impressionistic music theory, medieval polyphony, and renaissance counterpoint most recently creating a musical score of sacred motets written by the sixteenth-century Flemish composer Noe Faignant.

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